Next Level Riding | Is This Mountain Bike Trail in Canada “the Hardest Trail in the World”?

“It’s definitely up there. It changed my perspective on what a difficult trail could be…”

Hardest trail in the world - BCpoc

The hardest trail in the world? Watch the full video below. Photo: BCPov / YouTube Screenshot

A lot of the time when you watch footage of a ridiculous downhill mountain bike run, what you’re watching is a rider sail effortlessly over every rock and root, round every corner and over every jump no problem at all.

Of course, that doesn’t always happen first time. What’s probably happened a bunch of times before the footage you’re watching is excruciating track checking from the rider, practice run after practice run, maybe a few over-the-handlebars, and no doubt a whole lot of runs where at the very least not everything went absolutely according to plan.

That’s why we like this video from the BCpov crew. The video is titled ‘The Hardest Trail in the World?’ but it’s not just GoPro footage of a professional sending it accompanied by AWOLNATION – Sail. The footage sees the group stopping to check out the feature and talking through how to ride it before our narrator gives it a try; not with the best success.

“It’s definitely up there. It changed my perspective on what a difficult trail could be…”

It’s a bit like being on an actual group ride, really. It’s one hell of a trail no doubt, but it’s still a lot more relatable – the build-up at least! – to normal riders than your average headcam footage from Red Bull Rampage anyway.

The guys in the video don’t list the exact location of the trail, stating that it’s under the radar and they “wouldn’t want anyone to be on the trail who shouldn’t be on the trail” – which is fair enough.

It’s somewhere in British Columbia in Canada anyway, which obviously narrows down the possibilities massively if you are trying to find it (though a comment says “If you ask around in the Sea to Sky area and are a good enough rider, someone would probably show you it”).

The video is a long old watch, but we’re betting that once you start, you won’t be able to look away:

“The title says that this trail might be the hardest trail in the world,” says the narrator. “It’s definitely up there. It changed my perspective on what a difficult trail could be.”

So what is it that makes the trail so hard? It’s tight and it’s steep… and it’s tight… and it’s steep. Even on camera the trail looks scary, so just imagine how difficult this looked in real life, and the narrator’s eventual fall wouldn’t inspire a lot of confidence in some people (glad to read in the comments that he’s okay!).

The video also shows two-time Canadian downhill mountain biking champion Matt Beer sending it (albeit successfully), but that should show you the level this trail is at.

It also looks like a hell of a lot of fun, though. It’s definitely one of those which after watching a lot of people would want to get out and ride… which we’re guessing is why the narrator omitted the trail name!

Let us know what you think. Know a trail harder? Give it a shoutout!

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Marin County, California | Two Doctors Charged for Mountain Biking Illegally… in the Birthplace of Mountain Biking

“I don’t want to be 65 before my vision for trail access sharing in Marin County is implemented…”

Nicasio Reservoir Marin County mountain biking

With views like this, it’s crazy to think Marin County California has just a couple of legal MTB trails. Photo: Getty

Two mountain bikers face potential fines of $1000 and imprisonment in a county jail for resisting arrest while mountain biking illegally in Marin County, California.

Oddly enough, while Marin County can actually be said to be the birthplace of the entire sport, the county has harsh restrictions on mountain biking.

The county was home to the first mountain bike race ever and can take credit for legends of the sport like Gary Fisher. After the quick growth of mountain biking as a sport in the 70s and 80s though, legislation was introduced to ban mountain bikers from nearly all singletrail in the area.

As such, while the area is written into the folklore of the sport, you can actually count the trails it’s legal to ride a mountain bike on in Marin County on one hand.

It’s a bit like Footloose in that way, except instead of having the local minister to blame for banning dancing, you’ve got scared 70s & 80s hikers to blame for banning mountain biking. Oh, and it’s actually real as well.

Marin County mountain biking 2

View of Stinson Beach from Mt. Tamalpais, Marin County, California. Photo: Getty

The two riders caught on this occasion were both doctors – Dr. Paul Cameron, a Corte Madera dentist, and Dr David Carbonell, an emergency room physician – and were charged with “riding their bicycles illegally on Marin County open space land where bikes are prohibited and resisting arrest when a Marin County sheriff’s deputy attempted to issue them a citation,” writes the Marin Independent Journal.

A quick flick through the Marin Independent Journal’s archives suggests trail access is quite the hot topic in the area.

Dr Carbonell is described as a co-founder of the New Paradigm Trail Group, a group which has declared the country roads and trail management plan in the area a failure, saying there is not enough access for bikes.

Open Space Superintendent Ari Golan says the fine for riding illegally on open space land is $199 including court costs. The fine for a second offence is $410 and all violations after that cost up to $615.

Resisting arrest meanwhile carries the maximum punishment of a $1,000 and imprisonment in a county jail for up to a year.

The doctors were riding the Piedmont Trail in the Baltimore Canyon Open Space Preserve on December 12th when they were caught.

Marin County mountain biking

Marin County, the troubled home of mountain biking. Photo: Getty

Sheriff’s Lt. Jeff Edwards said: “They were seen by one of the open space deputies riding on a trail they were restricted from riding bikes on. The deputy attempted to stop them and they rode away from him.”

The deputy was then however able to catch up with the mountain bikers, grabbing Cameron’s arm to stop him and later identifying Carbonell.

Carbonell is quoted as having said (in February of 2017): “I don’t want to be 65 years old before I see my vision for trail access sharing in Marin County implemented.”

Linda Novy of Fairfax, a Marin Conservation League board member, said, “These guys were breaking the law and then they tried to evade it. I think it is really shameful.

“This is really proof that enforcement is very necessary. There are some people, and these are examples of those people, who just don’t think the rules apply to them. We may never get them to comply unless they’re arrested.”

Cameron has pleaded not guilty to both charges, while Carbonell’s arraignment is scheduled for January 24.

Update: We have been informed that the riders in question were not pursued for citation for riding an illegal trail, and that the trail they were riding is actually legal for mountain bikers to ride during the day. The reason they were pursued was for riding the trail at dusk.

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New Year’s Resolutions | 17 Challenges Every Cyclist Should Attempt in 2018

Here are just a few ways to take your two-wheeled life to the next level in the new year…

Myriam Nicole on a trail near Funchal, Madeira. Photo: Jean-Baptiste Liautard

New year, new you? Well, that’s a shame. We liked the old you, though even the best of us can do with a little bit of self-improvement from time to time.

Still, we much prefer new year, same you – but maybe with a bit more direction. A new year is a great chance to kickstart your biking lifestyle, particularly if you’ve found yourself in a bit of a lull at the end of 2017.

“Perhaps you’ve not been getting as much time on the bike as you’d like”

Perhaps you’ve not been getting as much time on the bike as you’d like, been riding the same routes over and over again or would like to meet some new riding partners.

Anyway, traditional New Year’s resolutions are great and all, but where’s the fun in focusing purely on losing weight or forcing yourself to go to the gym more? We’ve previously covered the fact that giving up chocolate may even be counter-productive for cyclists, so hang on to that box of Celebrations and why not pick a resolution that’ll help you get more from your time on two wheels? Here are a few ideas for how to do just that…

1) Introduce five + new people to the sport

mountain biking new year's resolutions

A ride out in Hiroshima, Japan. Photo: Suguru Saito/Red Bull Content Pool.

Five may seem like a lot, but it’s not like you’ve got to tick them all off in January. You’ve got twelve months to get just a handful of people to give cycling a serious go.

Maybe they’ve never cycled off-road, maybe they’re a regular commuter but have never seriously hit the roads on the weekend. Either way, it’s always fun to ride with new people and see the inevitable smile on their face.

You know how addictive the sport can be, and they might just feel the same way. You could give a mate a new hobby and get yourself a new regular riding buddy in the process.

2) Become a bike maintenance guru

15 New Year’s Resolutions Perfect for Every Cyclist 3

So you’re a pro at fixing a flat? Maybe you even know your way around your bike and can name all the components and their use without batting an eyelid – but we’re betting there’s still room for improvement on the maintenance front in one way or another.

Learning the inside-outs of your bike, what everything is there to do, how to maintain it and how to fix it if it goes wrong is one of the most useful things you will ever do. And it’ll make that expensive bike of yours last a whole lot longer, too.

3) Get into the habit of carrying the essentials

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Of course bikepacking is another ball game – but there’s plenty of stuff you should take on each right.

Especially if you’ve now learned your way around the bike, you’ll know how many problems could potentially arise when you are on the roads or the trails. If you’re ditching bad habits in the New Year then, why not pick up some good ones to replace them?

Chuck a spare inner tube or two in your bag, maybe some water, a phone, ID, a first-aid kit, a pump, tire levers, a puncture repair kit – even with the spare tubes – a good biking multi-tool, some zip-ties, duct tape, an extra layer of clothing, a beer or three, a derailleur hanger, a good supply of steeze and a head lamp… just for starters.

That way you’ll never end up having to try and repair your bike with a packet of crisps.

4) Find one big challenge and tailor your training towards it

mountain biking new year's resolutions

The Ho Chi Minh Trail. Photo: Josh Letchworth/Red Bull Content Pool

It’s great to just get out and ride, but why not set yourself a huge challenge to complete by the end of 2016 – whether that be riding in your first race, cycling through a series of cities or countries on the continent or riding a challenge like the North Coast 500 that’ll take quite a few days and require a good level of fitness.

Having this kind of thing to work towards is sure to make you ride harder and with more organisation. You’ll check your timings, check your fitness levels, check how far you’ve gone and strive to do even more in your next session. This is the way to take your riding and your fitness levels up a notch!

5) Ride with people better than you. Listen to them!

mountain biking new year's resolutions

You might not be able to shred with Myriam Nicole, but riding with someone better is a great way to improve. Photo: Jean-Bapiste Liautard

Riding with friends new to the bike is great fun, but if you want to advance your riding then getting out with the more advanced guys or girls is the way to go. Odds on you’ll notice a few things they’re doing that you aren’t, and there’s a good chance they’ll give you some pointers if they see you going wrong.

6) Remember to take photographs

Slovenia mountain biking

Mountain biking in the hills of Slovenia. Photo: Grega Silc

Okay, so we know the whole ‘Instagram’ mountain bike scene isn’t for everyone. Often it’s a bit too clean, it’s a bit too wanderlust-driven. Often, it doesn’t seem real.

But you don’t have to take photographs like that if you don’t want to. Taking a snap or two from on your rides is something you definitely won’t regret in 365 days time, whether that photograph is of the beautiful scenery, the bike, the mud, the mess or just you and your mates at the bar the hour after.

Stick them on Instagram if you want by all means, or don’t put them anywhere – even just keeping a folder-full of pics on your laptop means you’ll have easy access to a nostalgia-packed gallery come the end of the year.

7) Use the technology available… But don’t get too addicted

strava

Use them! Just don’t use them too much… Photo: iStock

There’s an app for that. For everything. For everything you could possibly think of. And if you’re not using them, they’re often giving you notifications or e-mails to ask you why you’re not using them.

What that means, though, is that you don’t have to shell out big bucks to get cycling technology that will help you keep track of, well, whatever the hell it is you want to keep track of.

Some of the best apps for cycling will track your fitness levels, your distance, your speed… Hell, these days they can probably tell what kind of bike your riding, if your tyres need inflated and whether or not your family actually loves you.

Making use of apps like Strava is great, and you should totally do it, stick it on Facebook if you want, keep it for your personal records or whatever else, but don’t get caught up too hard in the KOM chaos. Don’t become the type of person who becomes paranoid someone else on Strava is trying to ruin their life and in engages in a full-on viral argument with them. Cycling should always be for the fun of cycling – and apps should only be used to enhance this!

8) Help your scene grow in your local area

Get the spade out in 2018! Photo: Cal Jelley

Get the spade out in 2018! Photo: Cal Jelley

Giving back to your local cycling community can come in all shapes and forms. Whether you’re a mountain biker who is committing to trail-digging and maintenance for the first time or a road cyclist volunteering at a local race or helping with the running of a local club, this is a great way to get those feel-good vibes flowing and make a bunch of new friends.

9) Save up and travel… anywhere!

new year's resolutions mountain biking

There’s a whole world of riding out there… Photo: Stuart Kenny

Travelling is wonderful. That goes without saying. It shouldn’t just be your New Year’s resolution to travel though – find a more specific goal, a place that you’ve always wanted to go, that you’ve always been astounding by… and bring your bike with you!

Whether you end up heading to a mountain biking mecca, a setting from road cycling folklore or just take a train a bit further out than the local trails, it could end up being an experience that changes your riding habits forever.

10) Do something that absolutely terrifies you

mountain biking new year's resolutions

Myriam Nicole on a trail near Funchal, Madeira. Photo: Jean-Baptiste Liautard/Red Bull Content Pool

We don’t mean that you should cycle off a cliff here. Be reasonable. Don’t do something that’ll end in your inevitable injury… but do expand your horizons and make your life exciting!

How about learning to jump, slowly but surely at the skills section of your nearest bike centre, and then taking your new talent onto the trails? Trying to ride a World Cup track? Or what about committing to a huge uphill road loop you’ve never felt confident enough to attempt before? The glory of the ride is in the effort!

11) Don’t go a week without getting on your bike

mountain biking new year's resolutions

Carson Storch with the hike and bike. Photo: Paris Gore / Red Bull Content Pool

A challenge to start now and never finish. At the very least, it’s the kind of challenge which would get you out in the wilderness a whole lot more. And at most, it could completely reignite your love of cycling.

12) Try a new discipline

mountain biking new year's resolutions

Kate Courtney riding in Bend, Oregon. Photo: Paris Gore / Red Bull Content Pool

We’ve been talking a lot about resolutions that fit road cycling, mountain biking and beyond in this article, so how about this one; why not swap bikes for a while?

If you’re a hardcore roadie, take to the mountains and get dirty. If you’re MTB mad, climb on a road bike and take an alternative route through the scenery – or get going on a BMX or give cyclocross a try.

If nothing else, it’s always nice to mix things up for a while, and if you do hate it, at least you’ll have some good new slams for your next rap battle with your tribal two-wheeled enemies.

13) Ride in every type of weather

mountain biking new year's resolutions

It’s not as slippy as you’d think… Photo: Matthew DeLorme/Red Bull Content Pool

If you live in Britain, this isn’t so much a resolution as a reality. If you don’t ride your bike in every type of weather condition, you’re probably not going to end up riding much of your bike at all.

But that’s part of the beauty. The days spent powering through pouring rain only make it better when you get to the warm shower, and in the months that follow when you’re riding in the sun. The days spent battling against 50mph winds only make it sweeter when you’re cruising on a sweet summer day.

It’s a rite of passage for any budding cyclist to have experienced the worst as well as the best when they’re on two wheels. Just be careful things don’t get too slippy!

14) Drink More Post-Ride Beers

how-to-open-beer-bottle-with-bike-pedal

A handy hack when you’ve lost your bottle opener… Photo: Stuart Kenny

Y’know, in moderation and stuff. We don’t like New Year’s resolutions that say “do less of this stuff”, though. Less is boring. So maybe do more instead?

More biking, more day rides, more night rides, more pedalling, more pushing, more risks, and yeah, why not, more post-ride beers as well. Enjoy 2018 folks. We’ve got a good feeling about the 12 months ahead.

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Here’s What Happens When You Put Mountain Bike Suspension Forks In A Hydraulic Press

Find a loved one, hold them close, and brace yourself for some seriously brutal footage

mountain-bike-fork-hydraulic-press

Screenshot: YouTube (via Hydraulic Press Channel)

Go inside your mind palace and picture your mountain bike. Got it? OK. Good. Now, try to picture your mountain bike without its suspension fork. Looks odd, doesn’t it? Looks, well, it doesn’t really look much like your mountain bike anymore does it? Well imagine a scenario where you discover your mountain bike is inexplicably missing its fork, at the exact same time you get a DVD in the post.

What’s on the DVD? What the hell’s on it? You say these questions out loud but then you remember you live alone. You’ve always lived alone. Just you, your mountain bike, and the call of the trails. You don’t need companionship. Never have, never will. Companionship is for the weak, the needy; life’s losers. Turning the mystery DVD over in your hands, you think about watching it but are scared of what you might see on there if you do.

“RIP suspension fork. U r wiv da angles now.”

After roughly 10 minutes of looking at the disc, you decide that it’s not going to insert itself into the DVD player and so tentatively make your move. A button is pressed. The disc-tray comes out, you gently place the disc down before sending the tray back from whence it came. There’s a brief moment when nothing happens and then it’s there. Up on your flatscreen. Footage of your fork clamped in a hydraulic press.

mountain-bike-suspension-fork-hydraulic-press-channel

Screenshot: YouTube (via Hydraulic Press Channel)

You take sharp intake of breath. What is this? What’s happening? You pinch yourself in a mad, desperate, attempt to wake yourself from the nightmare. A friendly Scandinavian voice speaks: “Yeah, everything is now ready.”

“Ready for what? READY FOR WHAT?!” you shout, with panic in your voice and beads of sweat cascading down your forehead.

The hydraulic press kicks into life. The sound it makes. The horror, oh the horror. You watch, not wanting to but unable to stop yourself, as your mountain bike fork gets mangled and disfigured by the sheer force being put on it from above. It’s brutal. It’s savage. It’s the Hydraulic Press YouTube Channel doing the only thing they know; crushing stuff with a hydraulic press.

RIP suspension fork. U r wiv da angles now. Video below.

mountain-bike-suspension-fork-hydraulic-press-3

Screenshot: YouTube (via Hydraulic Press Channel)

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Screenshot: YouTube (via Hydraulic Press Channel)

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Screenshot: YouTube (via Hydraulic Press Channel)

mountain-bike-suspension-fork-6

Screenshot: YouTube (via Hydraulic Press Channel)

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Screenshot: YouTube (via Hydraulic Press Channel)

If you’re still with us, and you’ve got the stomach for it, here’s what a saddle looks like before and after a hydraulic press session:

mountain-bike-saddle-hydraulic-press

Screenshot: YouTube (via Hydraulic Press Channel)

hydraulic-press-bike-saddle-2

Screenshot: YouTube (via Hydraulic Press Channel)

If you’re still with us, and you’ve got the stomach for it, here’s what a bike lock looks like before and after a go in the big HP:

bike-lock-hydraulic-press

Screenshot: YouTube (via Hydraulic Press Channel)

bike-lock-hydraulic-press

Screenshot: YouTube (via Hydraulic Press Channel)

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The post Here’s What Happens When You Put Mountain Bike Suspension Forks In A Hydraulic Press appeared first on Mpora.

Frames of Mind | Matt Jones Just Released One of the Most Creative Mountain Bike Edits We’ve Seen This Year

Featuring five world firsts and filming techniques right out a video game…

Photo: Red Bull Content Pool

Ladies and gentleman, watch Matt Jones coming of age. With his super-slick style and huge creative talent, we’ve known Matt was capable of putting together an edit like this for ages… and finally he has.

 

This is the perfect mix of Semenuk styleMacAskill ingenuity and something that’s all Matt’s own.

With a six month build done by Kye Forte, Matt’s dream track has come to life and he absolutely smashes it. Big air, totally original tricks and fantastic editing work by Cut Media make this one of our favourite edits of the year.

It’s also packed full of five world’s firsts – Bum Slide, 270 Rim Bonk, Hitching Post Flip to Feet, Decade Tsunami and Backflip Superman to tuck no hander.

Take a bow Matt!

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The post Frames of Mind | Matt Jones Just Released One of the Most Creative Mountain Bike Edits We’ve Seen This Year appeared first on Mpora.